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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
suspect's trip back home in 2012. tracking that for us, in some really heated testimony today, cnn's jim acosta. jim? lay out the information for us. what's being said? what is the controversy? >> reporter: well, chris, you're absolutely right, lawmakers on capitol hill are trying to get to the bottom of what was known about the older suspect who is now dead, tamerlan tsarnaev, and this trip ta hat he took to rusa last year. law makes want to know why is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to make this trip in the first place. should he have been stopped before he went overseas? when overseas what did he do? what was he up to when he was over there? some of this is stemming from some of the conflicting stories, quite frankly, chris, from federal officials over tamerlan tsarnaev's status. senator lindsey graham, republican from south carolina, told reporters yesterday that tamerlan was on a no-fly list, that he was on some sort of terror watch list a federal law enforcement official has told cnn that is not the case. and senator charles grassley, graham's republican colleague in the senate
and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: any way jim so i'm saying to jacki schechner when she's in my bed yesterday morning along with a bunch of other people -- >> what? >> stephanie: i'm sorry the camera is on. >> along with a bunch of other people? [ laughter ] >> stephanie: little titillating. i had a dinner party saturday night and it had more to do with -- jacki, we all partied a little hardy. it was a big slumber party. >> very responsible in l.a. if you're going to consume too many adult beverages to make the decision not to drive so that's what we did. lucky enough, stephanie has a home that's decorated like a bed and breakfast and you can pick your room. >> stephanie: exactly. just saying. not what you thought. >> would you like the naked marilyn photograph room. would you like the country breakfast room? >> stephanie: all right. anyway, i was trying to get jim's attention. good morning jacki. thank god it was a slow "newsweek" last week. >> we have lily tomlin today. >> stephanie: here's jacki schechner. >> happy monday. governor deval patrick is asking massachusetts residents
to work with them before on cases. between the fbi and atf there's probably no better lab. as jim will tell you, when a bomb goes off, it may get blown to bits, but those are bits that we can recover. that his agency and the fbi can put together. they can understand the device. and perhaps find a signature aspect to that. so we've got a forensic investigation that's going on as far as the bomb and where it went off and what it was composed of and who may have built it. we also have what you just talked about, chris, that photographic evidence. as you and i talked yesterday, i guarantee you yesterday and today there are photographs of the individual or individuals who placed those devices. we just have to separate the weak from the -- in this case the killers from the crowd and we'll know who did that. >> let me go over to mr. cavanaugh. james, it seems to me a picture dh can be blown up and stud did, what more would you want actually than someone dropping the black bag and walking away from the bomb site? >> chris, i've worked many cases over the years with no pictures at all. so
. let's bring in retired atf special agent in charge, nbc news analyst jim cavanaugh. jim, it's, it's a changing situation. but certainly it is a dramatic scene. it almost looks like a war zone, streets empty, we don't know how many officers are on the scene. but the tension seems to be remarkably high. there's some thought that perhaps dzhokah tsarnaev is holed up and is being negotiated with at this point. >> alex, that's exactly right. you know when you're in command of a situation like this, i always like to break it down to the main things that handle the main crisis points and address those. and there's three interlocking rings here that are affecting boston and the citizens. and that's what the commanders have got to focus on. one is the standoff with dzhokhar, we can talk about how that interlocks and what's going on there. the second is, the placement of another pressure cooker device in the city that they've located. and the question of are there more. and then the third interlocking circle is, whether or not there's these two accomplices, as pete williams described and ma
-three minutes after the hour. jim ward on air guitar. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. todd in idaho, you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi, todd. >> caller: hi, how are ya? i was wondering why no one was talking about the warrantless access that the s.w.a.t. teams went from house to house in boston, i don't know if i would allow that. is that legal? >> stephanie: the house-to-house searches? >> caller: yeah. they have to have a warrant to do that, don't they? >> stephanie: i don't -- you know -- wow, i'm not certain. >> you would think. >> caller: i mean you were talking earlier about we live in a land of laws and that's one of the biggest ones -- >> how do you know they didn't have a warrant? >> caller: well, that's what i'm wondering. >> i think with something as high-pro file as this they wouldn't screw something like that up. >> stephanie: the miranda rights not being read right away -- clearly that was an emergency. perhaps i'm not as versed of my civil liberties as i should be. >> in danger of being punted. >> stephanie: exactly. >> talking
has now been canceled. clearly there is internal debate. jim walsh is a international security analyst. he calls boston home and, jim, good morning to you. >> good morning. bill: just the sense of debate that is quite clear what you put out and what you don't, what do you believe about that? >> i think there are a couple of considerations law enforcement is looking at. you don't want to put out a photo if in some way that tells the culprit or suspect something that enables them, makes it more difficult for them to find. you don't want to tip them off if you don't have to. particularly with the fbi some sense of the richard jewell episode that still hangs over their heads. just because you have a suspect that doesn't mean they're guilty. by releasing the photo you increase the pressure, the public will look for the person. think i they want to get their you can it is in a row before they go public with it. we're seeing something we have never seen before, bill as i went on facebook, crowd sourcing which can be a powerful in a positive way and in a negative way. bill: what is crowd sourc
: that is a good point that jim makes. there is no filter. when i grew up the images were very tightly controlled and you are right with social media, that's all gone now. >> stephanie: -- i don't know if it is a good or bad thing. there were the images of people jumps from the world trade center and that was devastating. >> stephanie: yeah, and that's your point people are like everybody has already seen it >> yes, and you just make a conscious decision that you're not going to cross that line. and that stuff has been readily available, i'm sure jim knows some of the conspiracy theory websites that have been around for a long long time will have some of these graphic images. >> stephanie: speaking of -- speaking of which, i guess al jones will get the award -- it's a pretty low bar, but alex jones yesterday. >> this is a reporter from his website. >> [ inaudible ] is this another false [ inaudible ] civil liberties [ inaudible ]? >> no. next question. >> what was the question? >> stephanie: was this a false depreciation by the government to take away our civil liberties. >>
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
wants a review by the intelligence committee. jim acosta joins us now from capitol hill. jim, what did she say exactly? >> well, anderson, senator feinstein, who is the chair of the senate intelligence committee, she did not say that the fbi dropped the ball. she didn't want to go that far, but she does want a review of what the fbi knows about all this and to get at what tamerlan tsarnaev was up to when he went back to russia back in 2012. he apparently made a trip there. and this was after he was apparently interviewed by the fbi back in 2011. the fbi said in a statement friday night that it had been asked to investigate tamerlan's ties to potential terror groups, to potential militant groups and that during that inquiry the fbi interviewed tamerlan. and so senator feinstein and some other senators here on capitol hill want to know how is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to travel to russia last year for six months and how did he get back into the country given all of that information? and so senator feinstein says there will be a hearing on this perhaps as early as tomorrow to get
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
jihadist. we'll show you that video and ask our security analyst jim walsh what all of this means. we had never used a contractor before and didn't know where to start. at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. from roofers to plumbers to dentists and more, angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey. twenty-five thousand mornings, give or take, is all we humans get. we spend them on treadmills. we spend them in traffic. and if we get lucky, really lucky, it dawns on us to go spend them in a world where a simple sunrise can still be magic. twenty-five thousand mornings. make sure some of them are pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. yeah, i'm looking to save, but i'm not sure which policy is right for me. you should try our cover
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
.s. chief national correspondent jim angle tells us money, power and influence are on the line. >> experienced with terrorists here at home, the u.s. is trying to avoid encouraging them overseas, as secretary of state john kerry arrived in turkey where he plans to announce an increase in not only aid to the syrian rebels of up to $10 million. as he empty with syrian opposition leader, the memories of boston were still fresh on his mind. and he spread his sorrow. before offering more aid to syrian rebel, the u.s. wants assurances that any new government would be democratic and inclusive. in other words, not dominated by radical islamists as he explained to congress this week. >> obviously there are dangers of extremists who are finding some funding and engaged in the battle and we want to try to separate them, if that is possible. >> u.s. aid would include military items such as body armor, communications equipment, and night vision goggles. but not weapons or ammunition. syrian opposition groups were there to demand more help from the international community. they argue the as
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
. and we got a hundred dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. a 12-year-old fr >>> good morning everyone. it's 7:56. your headlines on this tuesday morning statement-year-old boy is among those recovering from injuries from the explosions in boston. he was hit in the leg. he is due for more surgery. he was at the marathon finish line cheering on his mother who was in the race. >>> -year-old girl is dead, the victim of a fire in san jose overnight. it began around 11:30 last night. investigators say the fire was at a converted living location. it's a small unit the back of a standard home. her 4-year-old sister is now being treated for injuries as well. >
went off. former atf bomb investigator jim cavanaugh says it's obvious. >> large injuries were on the side of it, debris field to the left. some protected areas over on the right side that indicate the blast was to the one side of the trash receptacle. this was the scene of the blast. >> the fbi is considering publicly showing the pictures of the men they're looking for, and may do so later at a news conference today. >> pete, thank you very much. >>> drenching rain overnight in chicago. al? >> there are states of emergency throughout much of northern illinois into central illinois, because of the flooding they've gotten, the dan ryan expressway. it's a real mess there. chicago o'hare airport picking up over 4 inches of rain in the last 3 hours. in fact, airport reporting the terminal has actually had water on the floor. it's been flooding in there. still more heavy rain making its way through chicago today. it's going to continue to come down. we have flawed flood warnings much through missouri and illinois, and we're also looking for rainfall amounts anyway anyway to what the
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
. >> now the man you saw standing next to steve, his name is jim. he actually was a trauma nurse in iraq for 18 months. and he said all of those skills that he learned in iraq he used yesterday in boston. john? >> they treated scores of people. they saved, no doubt, scores of people. but they also, elizabeth, watched people die. >> they did. they did watch people die. and so steve who we just heard from, he told me the story one of the first patients he worked on was a young woman. he remembers her, blonde hair, blue eyes, maybe about 20 years old. sh came in and, you know, her leg was broken. her abdomen was open due to the explosion. she wasn't breathing. they gave her cpr. they tried over and over again. they just didn't have a pulse. he said when they were treating her after she passed away, they looked around for some kind of identification in her pockets but he said as far as he knew they just didn't know -- still couldn't figure out who she was. >> so sad. as we said, there are a number of people still in the hospital this morning. 17 in critical condition, 20 in serious condition
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
, they may have done it there or may have had a region, a quantum leap there, as jim was talking about, where will you develop those bomb-making skills? you don't go to m.i.t. to learn,build pressure cooker bombs, do you go to the caucuses, do you go to that area of the world where these devices have been used successfully to attack humanity for year upon year upon year. so i think that six-month period, the russians help us in that we may be able to identify who he was working with and gone to perhaps some type of terroristic training, bomb making school. realize the two brothers set some place. they built multiple pressure cooker bombs, built these hand-held devices. they did a lot. we have had fwhoermts u.s. try to blow their underwear up, try to blow their shoes up, try to blow their car up and they weren't successful, thank god. >> you think this goes beyond what they could pick up on the internet? >> i do i do. i think somebody sitting over their shoulder neath needed to be done. i don't think it was looking a this the seven or eight-page manual you could pull out of inspiration the al
people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospi
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
on this particular issue to comment on this and on her question of the political will. >> thank you very much, jim. if i knew the answer on political will, i suppose there would be more prophetic qualities to my history. one hopes that we will see it, one hopes that we will see immigration and gun control and other efforts. i spent my life as a diplomat and spent a good part of that life trying to importune other governments to live up to the rule of law. i was cha gripped, embarrassed -- chagrined, embarrassed and, indeed, in many ways felt undermined by the notion that our country which instructed me on numerous occasions to uphold the rule of law particularly indefinite detention without trial was something that we now practice and continue to practice despite all of the questions that people tend to want to raise about a war and prisoners of war and all of the rest. my sense is that we need a specific way forward. the report contains recommendations on a specific way forward; simply trial or military commission with rights and privileges equal to our article iii court or system. if that won't
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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